Posted in Oral Surgery, Sedation

Don’t Let Dental Anxiety Stop You.

We’ve all been nervous at some point in our life. Some fears are irrational while others are well earned from negative experiences. We understand what it’s like to feel uneasy and anxious. That’s why your comfort is always at the top of our mind! With sedation, you can have a more relaxing visit while taking care of your oral health needs.

Types of Sedation

Nitrous Oxide Sedation – Nitrous oxide, also known as laughing gas, is most often used for patients who are mildly or moderately anxious. It’s administered by placing a small mask over the patient’s nose. As the gas begins to work, the patient becomes calm, but is still awake and can communicate. When the gas is turned off, the effects of sedation wear off almost immediately.

Oral Sedation –Patients who are more anxious may require something stronger than nitrous oxide. With oral sedation, the patient may be sleepy but can also be aroused if necessary and can respond to simple commands.  Minor side effects such as nausea or vomiting can occur with some medications. You may need assistance to get home after sedation, and patients may need to stay for a short observation after dental treatment has been completed.

Body ImageIV Conscious Sedation – IV conscious sedation is usually used to help patients relax during surgery or more advanced dental procedures that take a longer to complete. During this form of conscious sedation an IV is placed in the patient’s vein in order to give the sedative medication. A patient is still able to respond to verbal commands and is aware of what is going on but the patient will not remember much of what happened during their procedure. This helps when dealing with a long procedure or patients that have a great deal of anxiety about surgery or their specific procedure.

General Anesthesia (IV Sedation) – General anesthesia puts a patient into a deep sleep. He or she is unable to feel pain or to move around. General anesthesia may be recommended if the patient:

  • Can’t relax or calm down enough for treatment to be performed safely, even with conscious sedation and other behavior management techniques
  • Needs oral surgery or other dental treatment that would be difficult for the patient to tolerate while awake
  • Needs a lot of dental work that can best be done in one long appointment rather than many shorter visits
  • Has a medical, physical or emotional disability that limits his or her ability to understand directions and be treated safely as an outpatient

We have many years of experience, and will use the safest and most effective medications appropriate for you. So, if you’re ready to relax in the chair with sleep dentistry, give us a call and schedule today.

Dr. Thomas Hoover, Dr. Neil Covin, and Dr. Satya Molleti
3401 Wooddale Avenue South
St. Louis Park, MN 55416
Phone: (952) 920-9209

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Posted in dental implants, Oral Surgery, Periodontal

Sinus Lift: what is it and do you need one?

A sinus lift is recommended when there is not enough bone height in the upper jaw or not enough room between sinuses for dental implants to be placed. The surgery adds necessary bone to the jaw and the sinuses on either side of your nose to build a stronger foundation in preparation for dental implants. The sinus membrane is lifted by a dental specialist (oral surgeon, endodontist or periodontist) to make room for the bone transplant.

Do I Need a Sinus Lift? Maybe…

shutterstock_133240190You may be a candidate for a sinus lift if you have bone loss due to periodontitis or resorption of bone after a prolonged period of having missing teeth (sunken jaw). It’s often necessary in these circumstances to augment the existing bone in the jaw in preparation for dental implants. The donor bone may come from your own body or other medically appropriate substitute. If the bone comes from your own body, it is most often taken from your hip or tibia. You will have x-rays taken to determine the anatomy of your jaw and sinuses, as well as a CT scan to accurately measure the height and width of your existing bone.

How’s a Sinus Lift Done?

The actual sinus lift procedure starts with your dental specialist creating an incision in the back of your mouth to reveal the bone, raising the sinus membrane up and away from your jaw. Then a small, circular shaped hole in the bone is opened. Granules of the bone graft are packed into this hole, and the tissue will then be closed with stitches.

Aftercare Instructions for Sinus Lift

don't sneezeAfter the procedure it is important to avoid blowing your nose or sneezing forcefully. These place you at risk for loosening the graft and stitches. You’ll have a saline wash to keep the inner lining of your nose wet, as well as an antimicrobial mouthwash that helps prevent infection at the incision site. Pain meds will be prescribed as will antibiotics. Be sure to complete the full round of antibiotics.

After a sinus lift, contact us if swelling or pain gets worse over time. Should bleeding not stop after two days or if the blood is bright red and continuous, your bone graft may have become dislodged, call us immediately. Also let us know if you develop a fever as this could be a sign of infection. The healing process generally takes between four to nine months. This allows the bone graft to mesh with your bone, and after it’s healed, you will be ready for your dental implants.

If you are interested in dental implants or have questions about the sinus lift procedure, call us today at (952) 920-92

 

Dr. Thomas Hoover, Dr. Neil Covin, and Dr. Satya Molleti
3401 Wooddale Avenue South
St. Louis Park, MN 55416
Phone: (952) 920-9209