Posted in dental implants, Oral Surgery

Neglecting Dental Care is Madness

Are you feeling lucky? Do you think you can fill out a perfect March Madness bracket? The odds are 1 in 9 quintillion. March Madness is known for last second game winners and unexpected wins. Games will have your heart beating quickly and have you on your feet to see what’ll happen next.

We all know about the thrillers and defeat that takes place during the tournament. But what we don’t know is what happens behind the scenes. Some injuries are kept quiet; such as dental injuries. If a player were to go down with a torn ACL, ruptured Achilles, or sprained ankle it’s well broadcasted. The University of California conducted a study about dental injuries in sports and found that basketball players suffered the highest amount of dental damage compared to all other intercollegiate sports.

_BlogBody1Believe it or not, basketball is considered a ‘non-contact’ sport. Mouth guards are only required in contact sports such as football, hockey, and boxing. The American Dental Association says that 1/3 of dental injuries are because of sports. The three most common types of tooth injuries are: cracked teeth, fractured roots, and tooth intrusions.

While playing basketball it is common to catch an unexpected elbow to your face and mouth. this can cause you to chip or lose teeth. During games, it’s important to communicate with your teammates which can be challenging while wearing a mouth guard. This is a possible reason why a mouth guard isn’t popular for basketball players. The University of California study also reveals that only 7% of collegiate basketball players use a mouth guard.

Basketball has a variety of protective gear for players. There are high top shoes to help support your ankle along with ankle braces. There are also padded compression shorts and shirts that are worn under your jersey to protect your body from any unpredictable falls. In a way, padded compression clothing is similar to a mouth guard. Both protect your body from experiencing the full force of a hit helping prevent greater injuries which can be expensive and time consuming to heal.

There are three different types of mouth guards: custom-made, Boil and Bite, and stock. A custom-made mouth guard is seen as the most comfortable and offers the best protection. They need to be manufactured by your dentist or in a specialized lab.  Most athletes prefer to have a custom fit one but one downside is they can be a pricey investment. You can think of the Boil and Bite as DIY custom fit mouth guards. The plastic pre-formed shape can be found in sporting stores. You simply boil it then bite into it for a custom fit. Stock mouth guards are the most inexpensive but don’t fit well and aren’t very comfortable. They can be bulky making breathing and talking a challenge.

The loss of a tooth or multiple teeth is not the only thing at risk for basketball players. Tooth loss can also cause bone damage to your jaw and tissues and rip your gum or lip. These injuries often lead to implants or root canals.

Over the years, wearing mouth guards have gained popularity throughout the sport. Top NBA stars like Lebron James, Kevin Durant, and Stephen Curry are known to wear mouth guards while playing. Did you know they have flavored mouth guards for better a better taste?

_BlogBody2Injuries are unpredictable but the best way to protect yourself is by taking precautions. As we now know the importance of wearing mouth guards lets share our knowledge. Hopefully, we will begin to see more star athletes and players wearing them. Change always starts small! So we encourage you and your family to play with your health in mind!

It’s going to be a heart-wrenching month of basketball. Here’s to our teams conquering the title or to us for that 1 in 9 quintillion!

Dr. Thomas Hoover, Dr. Neil Covin, and Dr. Satya Molleti
3401 Wooddale Avenue South
St. Louis Park, MN 55416
Phone: (952) 920-9209

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Posted in dental implants, oral health, Uncategorized

Modern vs Historical Dental Practices

Did you know barbers were the go-to people for concerns about your teeth? In the past, they not only groomed your face but also extracted and whitened your teeth. It wasn’t until 1840 that the first college Baltimore College of Dental Surgery opened. Today, the United States has over 60 schools and dentistry is considered a specialized practice. Let’s take a look back and see how modern dentistry came to be.

Toothbrushes, Toothpaste, and Floss

  • In ancient times chew sticks were used to help keep the mouth clean, they believed that it would get rid of unwanted particles.
  • The first toothbrush was made in China in 1498, handles were made from animal bones or bamboo, and the bristles came from the back of a pigs neck.
  • In 1824 soap was put into toothpaste and in the 1850s chalk was added.

Nowadays toothbrushes are available in different sizes, shapes, and colors. The handles are plastic and the bristles are made of nylon. Which is a long way from bones and pig hair!

Toothbrush

In 1873, Colgate produced the first toothpaste in a jar and by the 1890’s toothpaste was packaged in tubes. Imagine dipping your toothbrush into a jar. Now imagine everyone in your house dipping their toothbrush into that same jar. Doesn’t it just make you appreciate the growth in this field?

Source: Colgate

In 1815 silk thread was recommended for cleaning in between teeth and by the 1940’s nylon became the standard.

Source: Oral-B

Modern Dental Techniques

Modernized dentistry has greatly reduced the risk for infections and implants, crowns, and bridges, are now common cosmetic procedures.  Modern crowns are made of composite, porcelain, and metals. They strengthen damaged teeth and can improve your tooth’s overall shape. Bridges are used to fill the tooth gaps and are secured with a neighboring crown on each side. Today, dentistry is a specialized practice and after earning a dental degree, dentists are required to annually continue their education.

Dental implants are now the standard of care for missing teeth. These titanium roots are placed into your jawbone and fuse over time. Implants can anchor crowns, bridges, and dentures. They’ve gained popularity as they look and feel natural like your own teeth.

Implants

  • Crowns/Bridges
    • Crowns were made of human teeth, gold, ivory, and bone.
    • Bridges were gold and a sign of wealth.

Gold Crown

  • Implants
    • Whole tooth implants were from deceased lower class citizens, slaves or animals, and infections were common.
    • Seashells, sculpted bamboo, and copper were also used.
    • Iron pins supported a gold tooth to showcase your riches.

Putting on someone else’s teeth to replace yours is unheard of today because of our modern resources and technologies. Would you consider using people’s teeth to replace yours as resourceful or gross?

In the 1970’s orthodontists said goodbye to headgear and wiring and hello to stainless steel brackets. To fix your bite hooks are placed in your mouth and you will get a pack of rubber bands, slowly adjusting your jaw position with tension over many months.

Giving thanks to new technology we have another option called Invisalign. Packaged as a set of clear plastic aligners, every two weeks you change the tray. There are slight changes to each aligner and your teeth will slowly adjust into the perfect smile of your dreams. Besides not having metal in your mouth, Invisalign is taken out before every meal and snack. Is remembering to take them on and off too much of a hassle?

Ortho

  • Orthodontics
    • One of the first forms of teeth straightening had animal intestines as cords and it wrapped around each individual tooth.
    • Gold bands were also used and preferred because they didn’t rust. Silver was also used and wasn’t as expensive.
    • Ivory and wood were also used.

Can you believe that current teeth whitening procedures were accidentally discovered? In the past, peroxide was used to help strengthen patient’s gums but they got whiter teeth. Today teeth whitening can be done in office or with a take-home whitening kit from your dentist.

  • Whitening
    • Ancient Romans used human urine because the ammonia is an amazing stain remover.
    • Ancient Egyptians used ground pumice stone and white vinegar to make a whitening paste.
    • Barbers could file your teeth down and spread acid on them to help you have a whiter smile.

We have come a long way from pig hair, cadaver teeth and animal intestines in our dental care. Our dentists are highly trained with years of specialized education and we continually work to improve your overall health along with your dental and oral health. Reflecting back to where dentistry once was, we can remember where this field started and appreciate its success.  Call us to schedule your appointment today.

Dr. Thomas Hoover, Dr. Neil Covin, and Dr. Satya Molleti
3401 Wooddale Avenue South
St. Louis Park, MN 55416
Phone: (952) 920-9209

Posted in dental implants, Oral Surgery, Periodontal

Sinus Lift: what is it and do you need one?

A sinus lift is recommended when there is not enough bone height in the upper jaw or not enough room between sinuses for dental implants to be placed. The surgery adds necessary bone to the jaw and the sinuses on either side of your nose to build a stronger foundation in preparation for dental implants. The sinus membrane is lifted by a dental specialist (oral surgeon, endodontist or periodontist) to make room for the bone transplant.

Do I Need a Sinus Lift? Maybe…

shutterstock_133240190You may be a candidate for a sinus lift if you have bone loss due to periodontitis or resorption of bone after a prolonged period of having missing teeth (sunken jaw). It’s often necessary in these circumstances to augment the existing bone in the jaw in preparation for dental implants. The donor bone may come from your own body or other medically appropriate substitute. If the bone comes from your own body, it is most often taken from your hip or tibia. You will have x-rays taken to determine the anatomy of your jaw and sinuses, as well as a CT scan to accurately measure the height and width of your existing bone.

How’s a Sinus Lift Done?

The actual sinus lift procedure starts with your dental specialist creating an incision in the back of your mouth to reveal the bone, raising the sinus membrane up and away from your jaw. Then a small, circular shaped hole in the bone is opened. Granules of the bone graft are packed into this hole, and the tissue will then be closed with stitches.

Aftercare Instructions for Sinus Lift

don't sneezeAfter the procedure it is important to avoid blowing your nose or sneezing forcefully. These place you at risk for loosening the graft and stitches. You’ll have a saline wash to keep the inner lining of your nose wet, as well as an antimicrobial mouthwash that helps prevent infection at the incision site. Pain meds will be prescribed as will antibiotics. Be sure to complete the full round of antibiotics.

After a sinus lift, contact us if swelling or pain gets worse over time. Should bleeding not stop after two days or if the blood is bright red and continuous, your bone graft may have become dislodged, call us immediately. Also let us know if you develop a fever as this could be a sign of infection. The healing process generally takes between four to nine months. This allows the bone graft to mesh with your bone, and after it’s healed, you will be ready for your dental implants.

If you are interested in dental implants or have questions about the sinus lift procedure, call us today at (952) 920-92

 

Dr. Thomas Hoover, Dr. Neil Covin, and Dr. Satya Molleti
3401 Wooddale Avenue South
St. Louis Park, MN 55416
Phone: (952) 920-9209

Posted in dental implants

Implant Retained Dentures

PERIO-Title

Even if you may not be in the market for dentures, most people are at least familiar with the concept. Traditionally, they are worn over the gums and held in place by an adhesive. However, with the evolution of medical technology, dental implant posts are now placed into the jawbone and used as anchors. Dentures are then securely fixed to the posts, which provide structural integrity to the tooth and aid in the preservation of the jawbone.

Dental Implant Procedure for Dentures

There are a few separate steps to getting your retained dentures properly fitted and ready for action. After the initial consultation, your first procedure will involve placing the actual dental implants that will support the denture. This is done by making incisions into the gum and placing the implant posts securely into your jawbone. After a waiting period, a healing cap may then be placed on the head of each implant, which helps guide the gum tissue to heal properly. The cap is later replaced with regular abutments to hold the dentures in place. Finally, an impression is taken to create your perfect-fit dentures that will sit on your new implant structures. We then ensure the dentures fit comfortably and securely and make any necessary adjustments. Voila!

The Pros and Cons of Retained Dentures

One major factor for patients who choose to use retained dentures is their increased stability. Another benefit is the internal support they offer the jaw; without the implanted roots, jawbones degrade over time causing the structure of the face to sink, which affects your appearance and makes it difficult to secure traditional dentures. They also offer the freedom to eat many foods that would otherwise be impossible to enjoy, chewy foods in particular.

However, that is not to say they are drawback free. First and foremost, although it is a minor procedure, there is an invasive aspect not required with the use of traditional dentures. Additionally, the time it can take to place the implants and allow them to heal is more than some patients feel comfortable with.

Implant Supported Dentures or Traditional Dentures?

Ultimately it is great to have several options when it comes to revitalizing your smile. If you have traditional dentures or think you may be a candidate, ask us about retained dentures. We can give you all the information you need and develop a treatment plan for your individual case!

Dr. Thomas Hoover, Dr. Neil Covin, and Dr. Satya Molleti
3401 Wooddale Avenue South
St. Louis Park, MN 55416
Phone: (952) 920-9209